Big Bear Little Chair by Lizi Boyd

Making comparisons is one of the basic ways in which all of us — in particular, children — learn to make sense of the world. Which also explains the proliferation of picture books on opposites.

Continue reading

Advertisements

You Are (Not) Small by Anna Kang and Christopher Weyant

Making comparisons can be tricky, since it depends on who or what you are comparing. In this book, two fuzzy creatures can’t agree on whether one is big or the other is small, until some unexpected visitors (literally) drop in to offer them a fresh perspective.

Continue reading

Tall by Jez Alborough

As we have seen in his first book Hug, featured previously, Jez Alborough excels at telling stories with minimal words — just five different words this time, to be exact. And once you look at his beautifully expressive illustrations, you will understand why: his drawings already say so much that there’s really no need for words — well OK, just one per page.

In Tall, Bobo the monkey returns, and this time, instead of looking for a hug, he’s now trying his best to be, well, tall.

Continue reading

How Big Is the World? by Britta Teckentrup

Children are innately curious about everything — hence their never-ending questions for us. Some questions are easier than others to answer, though — for example, anything factual and *ahem* Googleable — while others are more open-ended and tricky. Lucky for us, then, that talented writers and illustrators exist to make our lives a little easier, by doing a lot of the hard thinking and research on our behalf, and then presenting the relevant information to kids in a neat, easy-to-understand yet old-fashioned way, i.e. in printed books.

Continue reading